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Royal processions of The grand ceremonial procession for King Bhumibol Adulyadej

Royal processions The grand ceremonial procession for King Bhumibol Adulyadej
( PR4US.com | Press Release | 2017-10-19 10:09:16 )
Royal processions

The transfer of the royal remains from the Dusit Maha Prasat Throne Hall to the royal crematorium, the transfer of royal relics from the royal crematorium to the Grand Palace, or the transfer of royal ashes to be enshrined or scattered at sea proceeds on a grand ceremonial procession where dozens of pullers and bearers are deployed. The grand ceremonial procession for King Bhumibol Adulyadej is made up of six processions. Royal chariots, vehicles, palanquins and other items reflecting his revered status and rank have been renovated or repaired for the task of moving and carrying the royal remains, relics and ashes. The pullers and bearers take part in partial and full rehearsals to ensure the funeral procession for the late King proceeds in a manner conjuring an image of him ascending to heaven.

The first procession: Phra Yannamas Sam Lam Khan
Phra Yannamas Sam Lam Khan is a large palanquin with three poles. Made of carved wood, gilded and lacquered, the structure is used to carry the royal urn from the Dusit Maha Prasat Throne Hall to Phra Maha Phichai Ratcharot.
The royal urn is carried by Phra Yannamas Sam Lam Khan from the Dusit Maha Prasat Throne Hall via Deva Phirom Gate to Maharat Road. The procession turns left to Tai Wang Road heading to Sanam Chai Road where the royal urn is moved to Phra Maha Phichai Ratcharot in front of Wat Phra Chetuphon. The distance is 817 metres and the procession is expected to take about 30 minutes.

The secThe second procession: Phra Maha Phichai Ratcharot

Made of carved wood, lacquered and gilded, and decorated with glass tiles, Phra Maha Phichai Ratcharot is a royal chariot in the shape of a busabok, or small elaborate pavilion throne. The Royal Chariot of Great Victory was built during the reign of King Rama I for use in the royal cremation of his father in 1796. The structure was later used to carry the royal urns of several earlier kings, queens and high-ranking royals.
Kroen Bandai Nak
The naga-shaped apparatus is an ancient ramp for raising or lowering the royal urn to the royal chariot or the royal crematorium. Before this equipment was introduced, men were used to carry the royal urn up or down with the help of scaffolding.ond procession
After the royal urn is transferred to Phra Maha Phichai Ratcharot by the use of the Kroen Bandai Nak, the procession moves along Sanam Chai Road to Ratchadamnoen Nai Road and to Sanam Laung. The distance is 890 metres and the procession is expected to take about two hours.

The third procession: Ratcharot Puen Yai

This royal cannon-equipped chariot is used to carry the royal urn of a king or a high-ranking royal holding a military rank in lieu of Phra Yannamas Sam Lam Khan from the Grand Palace or any other palace to the royal crematorium.
The royal urn is carried to the royal crematorium. The procession goes around the royal crematorium three times in a counter-clockwise direction.

The fourth procession: Rajendrayan

The palanquin was built during the reign of King Rama I in the shape of a busabok with a five-tier roof. Made of carved wood, the structure is gilded, lacquered and decorated with glass mosaic tiles. The base of the structure is embellished with figures of the khrut yut nak (garuda-holding naga). The Rajendrayan has four poles and is carried by 56 men.
The royal cinerary urn carrying the royal relics is transferred from the royal crematorium to the Rajendrayan and the procession proceeds to the Grand Palace.

The fifth procession: Rajendrayan Noi

This structure is used to carry the royal ashes container to Wat Phra Si Rattana Satsadaram in the Grand Palace. Built in the shape of a busabok, the palanquin is made of carved wood, gilded and lacquered and decorated with glass mosaic tiles. The Rajendrayan Noi has four poles and is carried by 56 men.
The royal cinerary urn carrying the royal relics is moved from the Dusit Maha Prasat Throne Hall to Phra Wiman on the Chakri Maha Prasat Throne Hall.

The sixth procession: the Cavalry

The procession is made of 77 mounted soldiers divided in two groups. The lead group comprises 44 officers including a section of six buglers, one commanding officer, and four officers carrying the unit's colours. They are followed by the second group of 33 cavalry officers.
The cavalry unit conveys a royal limousine carrying the royal ashes container from Phra Si Rattana Chedi in Wat Phra Si Rattana Satsadaram via Viset Chaisri Gate to Wat Rachabopit and Wat Bowonniwet Vihara.


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Raveevarn Chanvijit

0819346464
Pattanakarn38. Rd.
10250 Suanluang - Thailand

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