Industries

Run Time Monitoring Using an Event Data Logger

Just as with monitoring of other values such as equipment temperature, power factor and vibration, there are varying levels of detail when it comes to run time/event monitoring. In our latest White Paper, we examine several run-time applications and discuss typical solutions which record, store and analyze the data.
dataTaker Universal Input Data Logger
( PR4US.com | Press Release | 2017-05-11 16:19:16 )
The Basics of Monitoring Productivity, Equipment Monitoring, and More

Just as with monitoring of other values such as equipment temperature, power factor and vibration, there are varying levels of detail when it comes to run time/event monitoring.

At CAS DataLoggers, many of our callers want to see how often one or more of their machines are working and when. Often their goal is to pinpoint the duration and cause of machine downtime—is it a case of poor work productivity, or is there another cause at work?
In our latest White Paper, we examine several runtime applications and discuss typical solutions which record, store and analyze the data.

Introduction

Monitoring Runtime:

There are several business-critical reasons for technicians in plants and factories to monitor runtime:

A common application is recording Motor Runtime. Users can deploy a runtime data logger to automatically record whenever the motor turns on and off. A multichannel data logger, for example, can monitor 4 to 8 motors or pumps using this method. Meanwhile a ‘smart’ logger can also perform calculations, collects data by shift, runtime duration, log a specific period such as a half-hour block each day, etc.

Production managers can examine this collected data in detail to answer important questions such as ‘Why was the machine off for this duration? Is this due to routine maintenance or due to a lack of productivity?’

While most basic data loggers typically don’t get into this level of functionality, there are many models of intelligent devices which can monitor run time. To monitor runtime, these devices feature one or more digital channels.
Monitoring runtime can be as simple as attaching a small event data logger to a motor to measure its electrical field (for monitoring motor runtime, etc.). For example you can use a simple current switch on a power lead or whatever is turning the machine on and off. You can then view the cycle counts for switches on that machine within specific time periods.

However, if your application is more complex, such as viewing high-accuracy data in greater detail, you’ll need to use a more advanced method of measurement. Likewise, the number of points you need to monitor is a major factor to consider before you begin. For a large-scale runtime application example, if you have twenty or more machines located near each other, you can use a high-channel system to log each motor or piece of equipment.


For further information on Run Time and Event Logging, or to find the ideal solution for your application-specific needs, contact a CAS DataLoggers Application Specialist at (800) 956-4437 or visit our website at www.DataLoggerInc.com.


Press Information


Published by

Stew Thompson
8437 Mayfield Rd.
44026 Chesterland, Ohio - United States
http://www.dataloggerinc.com/

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